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Scroll down this page to read page 3 of the book on finding and working with cotton yarns.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
This collection is written for standard gauge Japanese machines. Skilled Passap users may succeed with many of the patterns but Passap language is not used in most.
Finding and working with cotton yarns……………………………………………………………………….page 3
Also see page 30 for “Be a Blend Master”
Cotton quadruplets—1 cardigan & 3 shells made in Cottontale 8 or Mayflower Cotton. Finished bust sizes from 35.8-55.3” …………………………………………………………..……………………….page 4
Oodles of details in this collection may be used elsewhere. They are:
Multicolor tuck hem………………………………………………………………………………………………...page 5
Automatic picot hem……………………………………………………………………………………………….page 6
Wanderlust cable……………………………………………………………………………………………………..page 9
Piping trim & bands………………………………………………………………………………………………..page 10
Tuck trim & 2 crocheted trims…………………………………………………………………………...page 11
Band-less armhole…………………………………………………………………………………………………..page 12
Tuck & roll trim……………………………………………………………………………………………………….page 12
South of the Border summer top to fit bust sizes 32-48. Actual bust measurement is about 6” larger than “size”. This design is for standard gauge machines……………….page 13
Panama Pants are yoga-styled pants with finished hip from 34.5-51.4. they are made with yeoman’s Panama 50%cotton/50% acrylic yarn and employ a short rowed seat. ….page 15
Cool Capris are cropped pants with side button tabs on the legs. They are made with 2 strands of Yeoman’s Brittany run together in finished hip sizes from 36-56……...page 17
Denim Skirt is made with Yeoman Indigo yarn with finished hip 35.7-44.3”………..page 19
Summer Set Kangaroo Tunic & Perfection Shorts tunic bust 36.7-47.7”, shorts hip 36-56”made with Yeoman Panama …………………………………………………………………………………….……page 21
Turtleneck Top with 3 hem and 3 neck finish options bust 34-51” made from a DIY blend of cotton & acrylic yarns………………………………………………………………………………………….page 26
Blend Master T made with a DIY blend in bust sizes 33.7-48.8”…………………………...page 28
Be a Blend Master—the art and science of combining multiple thin yarns…………….page 29

This collection of cotton clothes is designed with Japanese standard gauge machines in mind. None of the patterns require a ribber although it is an option in some of them.
Passap Knitters: many of these may be knitted on the Passap but most of the patterns do not use Passap language so thorough knowledge of how techniques are achieved is required by the knitter. I don’t recommend using Cottontale 8 on the Passap. It does knit for me but I find the resulting fabric hard and not pleasant. If you wish to knit the cotton quadruplets on the Passap, I suggest substituting Tamm Perle yarn. Length should come out the same but circumference will be 96% of that given in the pattern, creating sizes from 34.4-53” in the bust.
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Finding and working with
cotton yarns
Cotton yarn almost universally lofts and shrinks when washed. “Lofting” is the process whereby the yarn plumps up and fills in spaces in the stitches. Generally, this also makes it softer. You know what shrinkage is and it can be substantial and may vary from yarn to yarn and even from color to color of the same yarn. This being the case, it is essential to make a good sized swatch which is washed and dried at least once before taking its final measure. Where fit is critical, two washings are really recommended. To avoid annoyance at this delay, I have come up with a nifty plan: Make each swatch a usable dishcloth and actually use it. That will give it a rugged test and do something useful at the same time.

Quite a bit of cotton yarn biases. In my experience, Yeoman Panama does do this but Brittany does it less and Tamm Perle does not do so noticeably. Cottontale 8 and Mayflower Cotton seem to have little or no biasing. Like shrinkage, biasing can vary from cone to cone and color to color so the designs in this collection are all planned in such a way that a slight bias does not create a disaster.

100% cotton is the nicest against the skin and the best option for maximum comfort but it is heavier than similar amounts of wool or acrylic yarn would be and doesn’t have much resilience or memory. Sometimes it is worthwhile to compromise and use a blend to take advantage of the light weight, color-fastness and general stability of acrylic to moderate the tendency of some cottons to be heavy, fade and lose their shape. Yeoman Panama is a ready made 50/50 blend. You can also make your own by combining like colors of very thin cotton and synthetic yarns. Tamm Perle generally gets a gauge of 7 stitches/10 rows per inch. I have been able to match this gauge by combining a strand of 10/2 cotton with a strand of 2/24 acrylic. The same blend may also be made to match Yeoman Indigo in gauge. Panama gets a gauge of 8.25 stitches/11 rows per inch. This gauge may be closely approximated by combining a strand of 16/2 cotton with one of 2/15 acrylic. Do expect slight variation from yarn to yarn in the matter of gauge. The numbers don’t quite tell the whole story.

Yarn Sources: As of this writing, Yeoman Yarns are available from Knit It Now. Tamm Perle is available from The Knit Knack Shop. Cottontale 8 and Mayflower cotton are available from Country Knitting of Maine. Daisy Knits has a good deal on 10/2, 12/2 and 8/2 cotton. Stephanie’s Studio carries 16/2 and 6/2 cotton plus lots of thin acrylics that often blend well with the cotton colors. Peter Patchis has different specials every month and I have obtained very nice thin acrylics and cottons from him, too. I use yarn from all of these sources and have always been pleased. All have websites.